Sunday, August 25, 2019

Gourmet Health & Hiking Poles Weekend Retreat at Point Reyes

The Point Reyes website is limited in space so I’m posting info here for anyone who is interested in this weekend event, which is only offered once per year.

Location:  Clem Miller Environmental Education Center – we are SO lucky to have access to this amazing facility.  If you read the description of our location, you know we are OFF the grid at CMEE.  There is ZERO cell reception.  There is no electricity in the cabins.  There are 5 cabins on the property and one large bathhouse.  Each cabin sleeps about 20 and we will be 3 to 5 per cabin, depending on your selection.  Point Reyes provides 2 excellent/experienced facilitators for our weekend and s/he can assist with cabin selection.

Retreat Description:  Are you getting older? We hope so. But how to age as gracefully as possible?  You love the outdoors!

If you’ve ever considered consulting with a fitness coach or personal trainer, this is an excellent way to get started in understanding how to weave fitness into your life so that you can continue to enjoy your outdoor activities.  This retreat is designed so that each participant can connect with nature, rejuvenate and experience a variety of classes and activities specifically designed to help you maintain your ability to enjoy the outdoors.

Together we’ll enjoy Point Reyes and learn transformative skills focused on improving and maintaining your skeletal structure and quality of life.

The weekend will include structured classes, group movement and exercise sessions as well as a variety of health and wellness discussions. Participants may enjoy all or some of the activities.
Learn and practice skills and progressive routines to enhance your health as well as optimize, personalize and PROGRAM your fitness.

Expert instruction will help you improve your ability to hike efficiently and comfortably using poles. A variety of top quality poles will be provided – learn which model fits you best and will enable you to achieve your hiking goals.

Weekend rate includes two nights’ accommodations and most (healthy and delicious) meals.

Hikes: Saturday’s short hike is part of the hiking poles training. Sunday’s hikes: 2 levels will be offered (easy/gentle and stronger/exercise) so you can practice skills and experience the magic of Point Reyes.

From prior participants:
“I went from never having used poles to feeling confident. The food was amazing as were so many other aspects of the weekend.” Jaime
“Activities from day one that provide guidance on how to get the most out of the weekend. Jayah puts a lot of thought into her teaching methods to achieve individualized goals.” Julie
“Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your 1000% effort to teach us, care for us and inspire us to be fitter and healthier. I know you made each of our lives better in so many ways.” Clarice
“Exceptional training in a natural environment.” Carol

10:30 a.m. Friday, August 23, 2019 to about 4 pm on Sunday, August 25, 2019

Most retreats at Point Reyes run well over $400 and do not include the food.  This one is $315 (members) or $345 (non-members) and includes most of the food – see note at end of this post to see how you can experience a truly magical culinary experience as well as the training and camaraderie of this retreat.

Schedule:

Activities and times are approximate and subject to change due to weather or whim.

Friday:
• 10:30 to 11 Arrive at the Clem Miller Educational Center at Point Reyes National Seashore
• 11 to 12:30 Unload car, sign in with facilitator, get parking pass and repark car in nearby lot. Select cabin, arrange bedding. Settle in, lunch on your own.
• 1:00 Fitness for the Trail class
Six key elements determine your ability to maintain physical fitness. This interactive session progressively helps you create a more structurally-solid foundation. Individualized movements focus on improving joint health, balance, posture, endurance, flexibility and strength.
This is a combination lecture and participation which will give us a common language for the weekend and give you tools for establishing a healthy exercise routine. Participants will be able to assess their level in each category and learn movements and exercises in each that will help facilitate optimal physical health. Extremely easy, low to medium level of exertion.
• 4:45 Dinner Prep
• 5:30 Dinner (Discussion: individuals’ intros, issues, interests and goals)
• 7:00 Hiking Poles lecture, anatomy discussion and pole fitting (gearing up – variety of quality poles provided). Learn which poles fit you best and will help you achieve your goals.
• 8:15 Qi Gong guided meditation for organ health and relaxation with Master May Chen

Saturday:
• 7 to 8:30 Morning movements, Tai Chi & Breakfast (discussion: outline of the day)
• 8:45 Hiking pole training session and short hike (< 2 miles): Beginner to experienced hikers learn techniques which help improve performance on the trail. Optimal use of poles on uphill will improve your power, endurance and spine function; on the downhill, you’ll develop skills for improving confidence and saving your knees.
• 12:30 Lunch (Discussions: personal care tips, metabolism)
• 2:00 Strength & Balance session with bands (provided)
• 4:30 Dinner Prep
• 5:30 Dinner (Discussions: Gear, Trail Tips, what’s in your pack?)
• 7:00 “My Feet!” Session on feet including blister prevention followed by Qi Gong Meditation with Master May

Sunday:
• 7 to 8:30 Morning movements, Tai Chi & Breakfast
• 8:30 Practice Pole Hikes: Weather Permitting – Enjoy nature and experience the magic of Point Reyes. Two levels offered (Easy, gentle, nature hike or more energetic exercise training hike).
• 11:45 Stretches, Recovery strategies, including Foam Roller session
• 12:45 Lunch (Discussions: nutrition, wellness, fitting it all in)
• 2:15 Pack & Clean up
• 3:30 Farewell & Feedback gathering

Facility: – See description on the Point Reyes website   Scroll down to read about the Clem Miller Environmental Education Center.  There are 5 separate cabins, each of which sleeps over 20 and our retreat will be under 20 people total, so it’s 3 to 4 people per cabin.  We have LOTS of space!

Food

Our system is UNIQUE (and, if I do say so myself, brilliant) at Point Reyes, but it requires a little up-front coordination which, in the long run, will save you a BUNCH of time and trouble.

Meals are coordinated ahead of time via a website that makes the food for the weekend easy, creative and fun. Rather than having to prepare all your meals for the whole weekend, you will be able to bring 2 to 3 items plus a few staples. This easy and well-organized website will enable us to see what everyone is bringing as our culinary experience unfolds.

Our focus is on healthy, nutritious, yummy meals that connect us as we share stories and enjoy health-related discussions. You will be able to contribute in a way that you’re comfortable, whether it’s a main dish, side dishes, snacks or staples (which will be listed so all you have to do is sign up for that item).

A full-service, commercial kitchen is provided.

Participants will need to advise the instructor of any food allergies or limitations.

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR REGISTERED PARTICIPANTS: Instructor will want to reach out to you 2-3 weeks before the class so you can get the custom and updated list of what to bring as well as prepare your food contributions. WHEN YOU REGISTER, you will want to ask the field seminar office for the instructor’s email so that you can reach out and receive the info you will need in order to participate in this retreat. The sooner you reach out to the instructor, the easier it will be for you to prepare.

What to Bring:

Point Reyes Health & Hiking Poles Weekend Retreat  Instructor’s Custom List of What to Bring

This is significantly more comprehensive than the “standard” what to bring on the Point Reyes site.  I suggest you START A PILE.  In the past, participants were “sure it was there,” and left home without something really basic.  If you are lacking anything, let instructor know as Jayah has extra of almost everything. When in doubt, pack extra.

  • Variable, layered clothing:
  • Your food contributions (via the sign-up genius website)
  • Your own cloth napkins (no paper please)
  • Toiletries (including soap)
  • Ear plugs (in case of snorers)
  • Hat and sun protection.
  • Good quality hiking shoes (with tread).
  • Your favorite face and body lotion (for one of our health discussions)
  • WARM sleeping bag or linens & pillows (linens not provided for bunkbeds, basic foam mattress only)
  • Any other linens, air mattress, foam mattress pad, etc. for your comfort (this is “glamping”). Instructor is seriously “princess and the pea” and has multilayer air mattress, foam pads, comfy sheets, tons of pillows and a teddy bear
  • Towels
  • Shower shoes
  • Flashlight, headlamp, lantern
  • Your favorite mug for Golden Milk (morning drink which will be provided), tea & coffee
  • Yoga mat
  • Extra pad(s) for under the mat (something to protect your knees)
  • A rag to wipe off your poles if they get dirty or wet
  • Rain gear, if necessary.
  • Fanny Pack OR Day pack with chest strap (or add bandana or something to TIE straps); water bottle(s) – note there is excellent filtered water at Clem Miller Environmental Education Center.

Optional Items:

  • Your favorite small piece of exercise equipment. Be creative, as we’ll be sharing our success stories.
  • Yoga strap (or terrycloth bathrobe belt)

Instructor has extra and you may request one especially if you’re an early responder:

  • Chair for outdoor seating (lawn or camp chair)
  • Foam roller
  • Fingerless bike gloves

** Hiking poles?  I have lots.  Bring your own or let me know if you’d like to borrow a pair/be fitted.  When you email me about this, please include your height.

To Register, click here

 

 

TheraBand Routine for Improved Posture, Upper Back Health

This holiday, I gave TheraBands.  These are the bands you get at PT – they come in a roll and are cut.  I cut 5′ lengths.  But the main gift was the routine I designed for using it to improve posture and activate upper back muscles.  So much of our lives are spent in the forward posture that pulls us into dis-ease.  These gentle strengthening movements are the opposite of computer work, driving, forward everything.  Form is important!

How you hold the band sets the stage.

  • Choose the color band that allows light work to start.
  • Hold loosely with the thumb on the same side as your fingers (overhand grip).
  • As you have a slight tension on the band, look at your wrist.  Make sure it’s STRAIGHT.  This is the biggest mistake people make.  In order to straighten your wrist, you actually have to push your hand outward.

1. Straight Arm Pull Apart

  • Arms straight out in front at a slight angle
  • Start with gentle tension of the band
  • Pull the band outward keeping arms and wrists straight.
  • As you pull the band back towards you, it will come closer to your chest and you should feel the muscles behind and between your shoulders
  • This is an activation movement, not a body-building exercise.  Use only the tension you need to feel the shoulders pull together behind you.
  • To protect your low back, put one foot slightly in front of the other into a stagger stance.  Notice how this softens your knees and helps you maintain a neutral spine.
  • Do 8 to 10 reps
  • The light tension means you can do this once a day just to activate the upper back muscles.

2. Wrist Work

  • Do exactly the same movement as above, but when you get to about 45 degree outward with your arms (about half way), push your wrists outward and slowly return.
  • The arms stay still, just the wrists move
  • Do 5 to 10 of these

3. Anchor Series

  • One arm is STRAIGHT out in front (not angled off to the side or up) and holds the band
  • Holding arm – thumb up (this is better for your shoulder)
  • Relax both shoulders down
  • With the other straight arm, pull the band downward and behind the body – this engages the latissimus dorsi
  • do each side 5 to 10 times
  • You can also pull outward (similar to #1).  Notice how the holding arm works very differently in this movement
  • Another variation that I love is to do slow circles.  I prefer circles backward (clockwise on the R, counterclockwise on the L)

With all of these movements, if there’s any discomfort AT ALL:

  • slow down
  • make the movement smaller
  • stop doing it

Remember to walk with attitude, swagger and walk young!

 

Back Strengthening – Bird Dog

April 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Coaching, Fitness & Health

Whenever I hear that someone has occasional back pain, I think of this exercise.  It’s a great back strengthener and is an excellent foundation helping people get ready for more strenuous exercises like planks.

Benefits:

  • Function:    Diagonal patterning, getting up and down from floor, Shoulder ROM (range of motion)
  • Balance:      Core work
  • Strength:     Back, core as well as weight bearing for the arms
  • Flexibility:   Elongating each arm and leg away from the body helps create length and stretches the muscles

The Set up – Start On All 4’s

  • Hands directly under shoulders, fingers spread
  • Notice that all 4 points of contact feel even
  • Engage your shoulder blades down away from your ears; keep your arms straight throughout the entire sequence.
  • Your head should remain neutral (this is best for your neck and means that you’ll be looking either down or just slightly in front of you).
  • This starting position is your neutral or reset that you honor in between each and every part of the movement.

Part 1 – The Form

The purpose of this initial movement is to establish optimal form in each reaching arm and leg.  Do this initial sequence each time you do bird dog.   Just one set activates the muscles and sets the stage for a better bird dog.

  • Extend L arm straight overhead/forward
  • Point Thumb up and reach thru your fingertips
  • Try to keep the remaining 3 points of contact (R arm and both knees/lower legs) evenly balanced
  • Hold for 3 breaths as you lengthen your arm
  • Notice how far your upper arm is from your ear
  • Slowly lower your arm back to the even 4 point contact
  • Take 1 to 2 breaths as you notice how the both arms and shoulders feel

Any time you need a break, lower to your forearms into Puppy Play or sit back into Child’s Pose

  • Repeat with R arm
  • (note: each time you do this notice which arm and leg you start with and make sure to alternate so you’re not always starting with the same arm/leg)
  • Extend L Leg straight out behind you
  • Try to keep your hips even
  • Flex your foot and push thru your heel (strongly flexing the foot facilitates a lower leg/Achilles and calf stretch and engages/strengthens the shin/tibialis anterior muscles
  • “Activating” the leg engages hip and leg muscles
  • Hold for 3 relaxed breaths
  • Notice the remaining 3 points of contact (both arms and other leg) and try to keep them evenly balanced
  • Slowly lower your leg back to All 4’s.
    Take 1 to 2 breaths as you notice how the both arms and shoulders feel
  • Repeat with R Leg

Part 2 – The Sweep

  • Gently sweep your L arm and R leg out at the same time until you reach the end point you had in Part 1
  • Once you reach the end point – the longest length from your fingertips to your heel, slowly lower the arm and leg back down
  • Repeat other side
  • Do this sweeping movement twice on each side
  • Remember to rest in between movements and only move on to the next Part when you’re ready for additional challenge.

Part 3 – The Hold

  • Extend opposite arm and leg out, reaching the fingers overhead and straightening the leg, pushing thru the heel, as in Part 2,
  • Hold for 1 to 2 breaths
  • Slowly lower
  • Repeat other side
  • Do each side 3 times

As this gets easier hold for 3, then 5 breaths, then 8 – up to 10 to 15 long, relaxed breaths (approximately 1 minute)

 

Staying Active, Fit AND Maintaining Muscle

You work hard to stay fit and active.

You hike, but do you strength train?  If so, are you doing everything you can to HOLD ONTO your muscles?

“Bodyweight underestimates body fat during the aging process because adults lose 5 to 7 lbs of muscle every decade of life unless they perform regular strength exercises.”

“Perhaps the main reason that diets do not work over the long term is that up to 25% of the weight lost on low-calorie diets is muscle tissue….muscle loss leads to a reduction in resting metabolic rate, which greatly increases the difficulty of maintaining the weight loss.”

“Several studies have demonstrated greater strength and muscle gains when extra protein is consumed just before or just after the weight workout.”

**A growing body of research has found that another way to increase protein synthesis is to consume some protein right after strength training.  This doesn’t call for protein supplements – a cup of milk or yogurt after a workout may be enough.**

Above in quotes are excerpts from Chapter 10 of the manual Fitness Professional’s Guide to Strength Training Older Adults.

Above in ** is taken from the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter, Nov 2015 issue

These 2 excellent resources are saying the SAME thing.

And then there’s the question of whether or not you’re doing the BEST exercises for YOU.  That’s another blog post, but the word that describes doing the most efficient, most beneficial exercises for YOU (including the concept of injury prevention) – is programming.  It’s what trainers do for their clients.  Form matters!

 

Mindfulness prevents falls

This is the exercise I teach at all my mobility classes because it encourages and enhances mindfulness.  Mindfulness is the syncing of the brain with the body.  As our body slows and our brain speeds ahead at its “regular” rat-race pace, this imbalance puts us at increased risk for falls.  When using poles for mobility, this mindfulness enables you to take a moment to remember to take your hands out of the straps.  Remember, never stand up or sit down with your hands in the straps. 

MODIFIED SQUAT:  This one simple exercise is excellent for slowing the brain down as well as improving:

  • leg strength (great for balance)
  • circulation
  • improved function (what’s more functional than standing up/sitting down?)
  • core strength which can significantly relieve back pain/discomfort/strain
  • plus it “tunes” the vestibular system  **  (see below)
  • excellent for posture and posture awareness (again, when done optimally)

The key to this exercise is the breath.  Learn and practice pursed lip breathing (also known as Pilates breathing)

  • Inhale fully thru your nose
  • Exhale thru pursed lips as if whistling
  • Notice the feeling in your tummy muscles (rectus abdominus) – the tightening (engagement/contraction/recruitment) of these core muscles is what helps your back

Starting Position:

  • Standing in front of a chair, feel the front of the chair at the back of your legs
  • Neutral Spine (see elsewhere on this blog for tips on optimal posture)
  • Feet and legs approx. hip width apart, keep parallel
  • Knees aim in same direction as feet (either straight ahead or slightly out – not in)

To Sit down:

  • Inhale and stand tall, feel front of chair at back of legs
  • Pursed lip exhale as you Slowly lower into chair, hinging at the hips (stick your bottom back – this is where you think of a public toilet)
  • Use arms if needed
  • Don’t “plop.”  Plopping Impact is really bad for the back
  • Use an arm chair if necessary – it’s the same amount of effort, but redistributed
  • Keep knees aligned (weakness in legs often brings knees together as a compensation)

To Stand:

  • Inhale while seated, elongating spine
  • Pursed lip exhale to rise, exhale throughout the entire standing process
  • Shift weight forward and rise. (as rising, lift from hamstrings, push forward with gluts and press in to feet – as in a dead lift)
  • Pause standing, check your balance
  • Squeeze gluts as you stand
  • Use an armchair if you tend to “hoist” yourself up.  This use of momentum often involves the low back vs. using the breath and the core

Return to seated position with legs also wide apart and knees pointing same direction as toes.

  • Each one of these is a rep (short for repetition)
  • Do up to 10 reps at a time until fatigue.
  • No pain!  Nothing should hurt even a little.  Use a sturdy arm chair if your knees complain.
  • When this is easy, slow them down .  Slower is harder and works (strengthens) the legs more.  Follow your breath.

FREE DO-OVERS

  • If you stand up without good form, you didn’t forget – you remembered late and you get free do-overs for life!
  • Called public toilets because as you sit down you stick your bottom out as if you don’t want to touch the toilet
  • Really focus on your body mechanics on this exercise.
  • This highly functional exercise will strengthen your legs.
  • Do these more slowly as you progress
  • Progress to arms crossing chest as legs get stronger.  You can also reach arms forward as you rise

**How to create healthy new habits that improve performance & safety.  Going the Distance, Article in 12/29/13 Parade Magazine by Bruce Grierson

“Simply standing up more is the best thing sedentary people can do to start becoming healthier, maintains Joan Vernikos, Ph.D., the former director of Life Sciences for NASA and author of the book Sitting Kills. The painless act of rising from your chair pumps blood from the feet to the head, and tunes the vestibular system, which helps maintain blood pressure and keeps you steady on your feet.”

Personal Training for Parkinson’s Disease

September 14, 2014 by  
Filed under Coaching, Fitness & Health, Testimonials

The sooner I can get people using poles, the better for building muscle memory.  People who face mobility challenges find profound freedom of movement  when using poles for walking and exercise.  Here’s a note from a wife/caregiver/client whose husband with PD who lived out the remainder of his life walking and being there for his family…

“Dear Friends of Jayah,

Our doctor recommended my husband receive physical therapy.  He had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease.  We visited the physical therapist, learned a lot, but she recommended Jayah Faye Paley on a regular basis to guide and help us.  She  gave Jayah the highest recommendation.

Jayah arrived like a breath of fresh air.  How she managed to keep such a sunshine disposition always astounds me, even now that she gives me exercises and help.  Parkinson’s is a draining disease.  I found I was angry a lot and irritable.  I wanted my old life back.  I hired help, but it was always a bit crazy; whereas, Jayah was solid.  She liked my husband, and he liked AND obeyed her; what he wouldn’t do for me, he did for her.  She came at first once or twice a week, but she was so valuable in keeping him active that I think she eventually came three times.  She knows her business thoroughly.  I suppose that is another reason my husband, a former UC B professor of engineering, admired and respected her.

She complimented him with his use of the poles, what he liked very much as he had been a superb skier.  She gave me respite, what I needed.  I looked forward to her coming because Iain was in good hands and I felt freedom.  Jayah also helped me with other care givers, guiding them to do exercises with my husband.  This was very important in the last years of his life when Parkinson’s truly took hold of his movement and activities.

I am happy to answer any further questions.  I look back on the last years of my husband’s life and realize that Jayah made the difference.  I look back on those years as precious because he was still present, what I miss so much now, even 4 1/2 years later.  He was diminished, but he was there and he tried to please.”

Sincerely,
Joan F, Berkeley, CA

Exercise to Improve Mindfulness & Balance

When I teach a POLES for Balance & Maintaining Mobility class, I work to achieve TWO goals:

  1. Helping people experience the freedom of movement possible when using poles for walking
  2. How to improve mindfulness

We do exercises for balance, ROM (range of motion), gait, etc.   I use the sit-to-stand exercise to help improve mindfulness.  We break this (very complicated) movement down to its individual elements.  Here’s an excerpt from an article which discusses one of the MANY benefits of this exercise:

Going the Distance, Article in 12/29/13 Parade Magazine by Bruce Grierson

… Simply standing up more is the best thing sedentary people can do to start becoming healthier, maintains Joan Vernikos, Ph.D., the former director of Life Sciences for NASA and author of the book Sitting Kills. The painless act of rising from your chair pumps blood from the feet to the head, and tunes the vestibular system, which helps maintain blood pressure and keeps you steady on your feet….

Some of the benefits of the sit to stand exercise (done optimally and progressively):

  • Leg Strength
  • Circulation
  • Core Strengthening
  • Low Back Healing (it’s true!)
  • Balance
  • Mindfulness

 

Want to Live Longer?

Excerpt from the Johns Hopkins Health After 50 Newsletter, July 2014:

~ Muscle your way to a longer life

Want to live longer? Build more muscle, says a new study. 

After analyzing data from the medical records of more than 3,50 Americans ages 55 and older, researchers concluded that the more muscle mass a person has, the less likely he or she will die prematurely, even after taking any cardiovascular and diabetic risk factors into account.  Specifically, people in the study who had the lowest muscle mass had a 30% higher chance of premature death than people who had the highest amounts.

Although the researchers couldn’t prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship between muscle and survival, they suggest it may have something to do with the metab0loism that promotes muscle mass and its association with longer survival.  It’s also common for people with more muscle mass to have a more active than average lifestyle which can contribute to longevity, too.  But, whatever the reason, the researchers found that muscle mass relative to a person’s height is a better predictor of longevity for older adults than the widely used body mass index (BMI), which estimates body fat based on weight and height.

If you want to build muscle, you should do a variety of strengthening exercises with dumbbells or resistance bands two to three times each week for about 30 minutes each session.  You can do exercises like pushups and squats, too, which involves using your own body weight.  If you’re new to strength training, ask your doctor to suggest the best exercises for you and seek out a certified trainer to show you proper form.

Note:  I hope you enjoy the above article.  I took the liberty of formatting it and adding paragraphs to make it easier to read.  One of the skills I enjoy is programming.  This means determining which exercises will help an individual to achieve his/her goals.  Weight training is called Progressive Resistance Exercise – emphasis on the word progressive.  If you create a good foundation, you can build little victories on top of each other.  This is SO important for preventing injury. 

Jayah Faye Paley, ACE & AFAA Certified Personal Trainer

Improve BALANCE and ENDURANCE with Communication

How are you feeling?  OK?  Fine?  Good?    A little tired?  Wobbly?  And what ON EARTH do those mean?  (they’re called fuzzy words)

I work with many people – some of whom have mobility and balance challenges.  If a person says – I’m OK, maybe s/he is, or perhaps I’m reading something else in his/her form.  I use a simple Zero to Ten scale to help us both communicate endurance.

You know the pain scale, right?  Zero is no pain; Ten is put me out of my misery.  This is the OPPOSITE.

BALANCE:

  • Zero is the worst it can be (almost no one I meet is really a zero, cause they show up).
  • Ten is the absolute best (think gymnast doing a back flip on the balance beam.)

ENDURANCE

  • Zero means – Completely Empty Fuel Tank – if I don’t sit down, I’m going to fall down – I’ve got nothing left.
  • Ten is the tippy top of my endurance.  Let’s stop talkin’ and let’s keep walkin’

Another example:  We’re walking along and my client communicates a Five.  It’s probably time to turn around or rest – certainly not go farther.  Be proactive.  Rest before you absolutely need to.  Slow down vs. stopping.  (see endurance tips on this blog)

If you have a partner/friend/buddy – consider using this method of communicating.  It’s helpful for you, BUT it’s also extremely helpful for the person with mobility challenges.  S/he will start to be more aware of the need to rest or slow down or turn around.

All kinds of things drain or energize people.  Just when you think someone has gone from a 5 to a 3, they communicate a 6.  They’re having fun!

Remember that this is very subjective.  A person’s “number” is just the first number that leaps into their consciousness.  It can change and refine as s/he becomes more self aware and this simple tool helps people to become more self aware.  Many of us lose the mind-body connection as we age.  Some really smart/cerebral people never worked on it to start with.  This simple tool will help us be/stay tuned into how we feel/are. 

Shoulder Stabilizer: The Arm Bar by Dr. Allen Wood

Good Chiropractic is healthy for those of us who USE our bodies.   I’ve known this doctor  for about 15 years and love that he’s sharing his wealth of knowledge so I can share it with AdventureBuddies 🙂

Enjoy, try this and feel your power!  This movement helps to stabilize the shoulder joint throughout a range of motion.   Life does not happen in one plane.  Developing shoulder stability dynamically in a functional range can help your posture and the health of your shoulder joint.

The “packing” also helps you to be more aware of holding this very movable joint in a more mindful way.

 

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