Sunday, December 15, 2019

Gourmet Health & Hiking Poles Weekend Retreat at Point Reyes

The Point Reyes website is limited in space so I’m posting info here for anyone who is interested in this weekend event, which is only offered once per year.

Location:  Clem Miller Environmental Education Center – we are SO lucky to have access to this amazing facility.  If you read the description of our location, you know we are OFF the grid at CMEE.  There is ZERO cell reception.  There is no electricity in the cabins.  There are 5 cabins on the property and one large bathhouse.  Each cabin sleeps about 20 and we will be 3 to 5 per cabin, depending on your selection.  Point Reyes provides 2 excellent/experienced facilitators for our weekend and s/he can assist with cabin selection.

Retreat Description:  Are you getting older? We hope so. But how to age as gracefully as possible?  You love the outdoors!

If you’ve ever considered consulting with a fitness coach or personal trainer, this is an excellent way to get started in understanding how to weave fitness into your life so that you can continue to enjoy your outdoor activities.  This retreat is designed so that each participant can connect with nature, rejuvenate and experience a variety of classes and activities specifically designed to help you maintain your ability to enjoy the outdoors.

Together we’ll enjoy Point Reyes and learn transformative skills focused on improving and maintaining your skeletal structure and quality of life.

The weekend will include structured classes, group movement and exercise sessions as well as a variety of health and wellness discussions. Participants may enjoy all or some of the activities.
Learn and practice skills and progressive routines to enhance your health as well as optimize, personalize and PROGRAM your fitness.

Expert instruction will help you improve your ability to hike efficiently and comfortably using poles. A variety of top quality poles will be provided – learn which model fits you best and will enable you to achieve your hiking goals.

Weekend rate includes two nights’ accommodations and most (healthy and delicious) meals.

Hikes: Saturday’s short hike is part of the hiking poles training. Sunday’s hikes: 2 levels will be offered (easy/gentle and stronger/exercise) so you can practice skills and experience the magic of Point Reyes.

From prior participants:
“I went from never having used poles to feeling confident. The food was amazing as were so many other aspects of the weekend.” Jaime
“Activities from day one that provide guidance on how to get the most out of the weekend. Jayah puts a lot of thought into her teaching methods to achieve individualized goals.” Julie
“Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your 1000% effort to teach us, care for us and inspire us to be fitter and healthier. I know you made each of our lives better in so many ways.” Clarice
“Exceptional training in a natural environment.” Carol

10:30 a.m. Friday, August 23, 2019 to about 4 pm on Sunday, August 25, 2019

Most retreats at Point Reyes run well over $400 and do not include the food.  This one is $315 (members) or $345 (non-members) and includes most of the food – see note at end of this post to see how you can experience a truly magical culinary experience as well as the training and camaraderie of this retreat.

Schedule:

Activities and times are approximate and subject to change due to weather or whim.

Friday:
• 10:30 to 11 Arrive at the Clem Miller Educational Center at Point Reyes National Seashore
• 11 to 12:30 Unload car, sign in with facilitator, get parking pass and repark car in nearby lot. Select cabin, arrange bedding. Settle in, lunch on your own.
• 1:00 Fitness for the Trail class
Six key elements determine your ability to maintain physical fitness. This interactive session progressively helps you create a more structurally-solid foundation. Individualized movements focus on improving joint health, balance, posture, endurance, flexibility and strength.
This is a combination lecture and participation which will give us a common language for the weekend and give you tools for establishing a healthy exercise routine. Participants will be able to assess their level in each category and learn movements and exercises in each that will help facilitate optimal physical health. Extremely easy, low to medium level of exertion.
• 4:45 Dinner Prep
• 5:30 Dinner (Discussion: individuals’ intros, issues, interests and goals)
• 7:00 Hiking Poles lecture, anatomy discussion and pole fitting (gearing up – variety of quality poles provided). Learn which poles fit you best and will help you achieve your goals.
• 8:15 Qi Gong guided meditation for organ health and relaxation with Master May Chen

Saturday:
• 7 to 8:30 Morning movements, Tai Chi & Breakfast (discussion: outline of the day)
• 8:45 Hiking pole training session and short hike (< 2 miles): Beginner to experienced hikers learn techniques which help improve performance on the trail. Optimal use of poles on uphill will improve your power, endurance and spine function; on the downhill, you’ll develop skills for improving confidence and saving your knees.
• 12:30 Lunch (Discussions: personal care tips, metabolism)
• 2:00 Strength & Balance session with bands (provided)
• 4:30 Dinner Prep
• 5:30 Dinner (Discussions: Gear, Trail Tips, what’s in your pack?)
• 7:00 “My Feet!” Session on feet including blister prevention followed by Qi Gong Meditation with Master May

Sunday:
• 7 to 8:30 Morning movements, Tai Chi & Breakfast
• 8:30 Practice Pole Hikes: Weather Permitting – Enjoy nature and experience the magic of Point Reyes. Two levels offered (Easy, gentle, nature hike or more energetic exercise training hike).
• 11:45 Stretches, Recovery strategies, including Foam Roller session
• 12:45 Lunch (Discussions: nutrition, wellness, fitting it all in)
• 2:15 Pack & Clean up
• 3:30 Farewell & Feedback gathering

Facility: – See description on the Point Reyes website   Scroll down to read about the Clem Miller Environmental Education Center.  There are 5 separate cabins, each of which sleeps over 20 and our retreat will be under 20 people total, so it’s 3 to 4 people per cabin.  We have LOTS of space!

Food

Our system is UNIQUE (and, if I do say so myself, brilliant) at Point Reyes, but it requires a little up-front coordination which, in the long run, will save you a BUNCH of time and trouble.

Meals are coordinated ahead of time via a website that makes the food for the weekend easy, creative and fun. Rather than having to prepare all your meals for the whole weekend, you will be able to bring 2 to 3 items plus a few staples. This easy and well-organized website will enable us to see what everyone is bringing as our culinary experience unfolds.

Our focus is on healthy, nutritious, yummy meals that connect us as we share stories and enjoy health-related discussions. You will be able to contribute in a way that you’re comfortable, whether it’s a main dish, side dishes, snacks or staples (which will be listed so all you have to do is sign up for that item).

A full-service, commercial kitchen is provided.

Participants will need to advise the instructor of any food allergies or limitations.

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR REGISTERED PARTICIPANTS: Instructor will want to reach out to you 2-3 weeks before the class so you can get the custom and updated list of what to bring as well as prepare your food contributions. WHEN YOU REGISTER, you will want to ask the field seminar office for the instructor’s email so that you can reach out and receive the info you will need in order to participate in this retreat. The sooner you reach out to the instructor, the easier it will be for you to prepare.

What to Bring:

Point Reyes Health & Hiking Poles Weekend Retreat  Instructor’s Custom List of What to Bring

This is significantly more comprehensive than the “standard” what to bring on the Point Reyes site.  I suggest you START A PILE.  In the past, participants were “sure it was there,” and left home without something really basic.  If you are lacking anything, let instructor know as Jayah has extra of almost everything. When in doubt, pack extra.

  • Variable, layered clothing:
  • Your food contributions (via the sign-up genius website)
  • Your own cloth napkins (no paper please)
  • Toiletries (including soap)
  • Ear plugs (in case of snorers)
  • Hat and sun protection.
  • Good quality hiking shoes (with tread).
  • Your favorite face and body lotion (for one of our health discussions)
  • WARM sleeping bag or linens & pillows (linens not provided for bunkbeds, basic foam mattress only)
  • Any other linens, air mattress, foam mattress pad, etc. for your comfort (this is “glamping”). Instructor is seriously “princess and the pea” and has multilayer air mattress, foam pads, comfy sheets, tons of pillows and a teddy bear
  • Towels
  • Shower shoes
  • Flashlight, headlamp, lantern
  • Your favorite mug for Golden Milk (morning drink which will be provided), tea & coffee
  • Yoga mat
  • Extra pad(s) for under the mat (something to protect your knees)
  • A rag to wipe off your poles if they get dirty or wet
  • Rain gear, if necessary.
  • Fanny Pack OR Day pack with chest strap (or add bandana or something to TIE straps); water bottle(s) – note there is excellent filtered water at Clem Miller Environmental Education Center.

Optional Items:

  • Your favorite small piece of exercise equipment. Be creative, as we’ll be sharing our success stories.
  • Yoga strap (or terrycloth bathrobe belt)

Instructor has extra and you may request one especially if you’re an early responder:

  • Chair for outdoor seating (lawn or camp chair)
  • Foam roller
  • Fingerless bike gloves

** Hiking poles?  I have lots.  Bring your own or let me know if you’d like to borrow a pair/be fitted.  When you email me about this, please include your height.

To Register, click here

 

 

Winter Hiking

November 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Nature, Pole Tips

Happy Thanksgiving!

Yesterday we did our first hike on Mt. Tamalpais since the rain last week.  The Fungus is AMONG US, the newts are crawling and the colors are RICH

As always, click on any photo to enlarge, click the back button to return to post.  The black mushrooms were a stunning discovery and a first for us.  The newt’s eyes are visible on a larger version.  Notice the pole tip for scale on the Chantrelle photo.  Enjoy and we hope to see you OTT (on the trail).

 

This lovely forest scene was taken

after we did our big climb.  There

are several trails on The Mountain

that I call “Just Show Up” trails.

It does not matter how fast we go,

we just DO IT.    Small steps, poles

pushing.  I estimate 25 to 35% assist

with my poles.  When I don’t hike with

poles, my legs COMPLAIN – a LOT.

Happy Trails!

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Tis the Season

November 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Travel

I will shortly be mailing out my yearly holiday letter with suggestions on gifts you can give to people you love who love the outdoors.  I hope you enjoy it.

Click on any photo to enjoy and click the back button to return to this post.  Above is Bryce, cryptobiotic crust (the desert floor) and some Utah rock.    This year’s journey to Utah State Parks was so timely and perfect that I’m opening our next journey up to AdventureBuddies (the meet up).

Above is Canyonlands:  Needles and Island in the Sky and Bryce.

The other bit of news is that I’ve joined the UC Botanic Garden and will be listing a gentle walk for the Pole Walking Meetup.  I was able to see the Maladora in bloom this year – enjoy!

PLEASE remember to shop REI, Amazon or Sierra Trading Post from the links on the Right Hand Side of this blog.  We get a very small commission and it costs you nothing.

Happy Holidays 2016

November 28, 2016 by  
Filed under Travel

Greetings AdventureBuddies, Friends & Family!

We wish you a healthy, happy holiday.

utah-2016-canyonlands utah-2016-bryce

We had many wonderful hikes this year, most of them local (see the flowers a few posts down on this blog), including our “annual” hiking journey to Utah National Parks.  Just 1/4 to 1/2 mile from any trail-head, we have parks practically to ourselves.   I go thru at least 2 pair of hiking shoes a year.  This year I’m taping to manage plantar fasciitis.  Bob has a knee and we’re waiting to hear what’s up with that.  Please do let us know about your year and enjoy the blog!

Peace!

Hiking and enjoying nature’s bounty in the Springtime

May 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Gallery, Nature

Lovely abundance of Spring flowers; enjoy!  Click on any photo to enlarge; press back button to return to post.

Flutterby2 Globe Lilies Foothills Butterfly Mariposa plus bee
Wind Poppy Red Ribbon Clarkia Globe Lilly plus red ribbon clardias

Flowers above are from Mt. Diablo and Foothills Park in Palo Alto.

Mariposa Foothills Butterfly Mariposa P1000876

Along the trail, we’ve seen way too much poison oak.  Remember to wash your poles if they come in contact with poison oak.  Soap & water or rubbing alcohol.  Leave them apart and let them dry overnight.  Below is Broomrape and the pods of the hop bush.  Hope you’re enjoying your outdoor adventures!

P1000907 P1000918

 

Spring in the Bay Area – Flowers & Such

May 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Nature

The Bay Area has such abundance.  Mt. Diablo has been amazing this year, as you can see.   Please – PLEASE click on the Mariposa and the Blow Wives.  Use the back button to return to post.

Yes, I know some photos temporarily disappear behind the banner.  The banners pay for the blog – Please remember to shop Amazon & REI from this blog.  Support your outdoors pole-using blogger 🙂

Diablo Mariposa Lilly Diablo Globe Lilly Blow Wives
Diablo Purple Larkspur Diablo Clymatis Diablo Thistle

Above (L to R by row): Mt. Diablo Mariposa Lilly, Mt. Diablo Globe Lilly, Blow Wives, Purple Larkspur, Clymatis, Thistle.

Diablo-Wind-Poppy-20160428-IMG_2481 Sunol Owl Clover Ribbon Clarkia
Sunol Bucolic Hillside P1000673 Heart Shaped Wood

Above (L to R by row):  Wind Poppy (Mt. Diablo), Owl’s Clover (Sunol – fields of them this year – astounding), Elegant Clarkia (Mt. Diablo), Bucolic Sunol hillside, Sunol Turtles, Heart Shaped cut on Tam…..and just a few more from my i-phone (yes, I’m dueling cameras OTT – on the trail)

Globe Lilly Jewel iphone blow wives iphone
Globe Lilly Bob Diablo Globe Lilly 2 Milkweed

Above more magical globe lilies.   Click on the middle one in the first row and see a lovely jewel flower.  This one is so small that you can walk right by and not not know it’s there.

Mt. Tam & Coastal Wildflowers – Spring 2016

May 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Nature

Rain (thank goodness) brought us some lovely hillsides full of flowers.  Remember to click on any photo to enlarge and press back button to return to post.

Pussy Ears Tam Iris Tam Lupine Hillside
Tam Cream Cup Tam Oakland Star Tulip Tam Iris Lavendar

Above (clockwise):  Pussy Ears compliments of my dear friend Alison (who is passionate about photography – duh), Iris, field of Lupine with some CA Golden Poppies, another iris, Oakland Star Tulip, Cream Cup.

Disposable Society – Warning, this is a rant

Yesterday I was watching one of my all-time  favorite cooking shows – a lady from California making a wonderful vegan soup recipe.  She poured the thick contents of the blender into the bowl, leaving a large amount in the blender then added water to the bowl to thin the soup.

She put the blender aside without scraping any of the remaining soup into the bowl.  She COULD have put the water into the blender and swished it around, capturing all the yummy ingredients instead of wasting them.  This would have taken NO extra time and would have demonstrated what I consider the essence of ecology cooking  **

Television chefs need to set good examples.  Silicone spatulas are a cook’s friend.  Scrape all that yummy (expensive, healthy ingredients) food into the bowl/pot/container or onto your plate.  Don’t waste it and, for heaven sake, don’t teach others to waste.

This chef’s wasteful behavior was frustrating to me because of all the people out there who might copy her example and has earned my rant.

Whether it’s mellow yellow in California or preservation of some resource – we all need to do our part.  Our recent journey to Glacier National Park was bittersweet.  The glaciers are disappearing.  The naysayers of climate change seem to want to give us permission to not pay attention.  Imagine a world without clean water.  Be thankful of light switches that work.  Hug a tree.

End of rant.

** What is ecology cooking?

Joyfully creating dishes
that are healthy and tasty
& conserve or preserve
energy, resources and/or time.

Glacier National Park Hiking Adventure 1 of 3

August 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Nature, Travel

An intrepid and lively group of hikers met up at Glacier National Park.  This journey, led by a remarkable hiker (and all-around lovely human bean) named Katy, comes from all over and hits the trails.  Katy coordinates hikes every day and this year she had to re-coordinate many of the hikes due to the fires in Montana.

I love to hike, but work gets in the way of my conditioning- BIG TIME.   It was HOT – in the 90’s at times and we were at elevation.  I’m such a flatlander –  we had arrived a day early so we could do a gentle acclimation hike.   This really brought home to me how sport-specific training is essential for activities.  I was wiped out after 3 days of 12+ miles. Fortunately,  I had brought plenty of cheese to have with my whines 🙂

I’ve separated photos into Animal, Vegetable & Mineral.  This is the Mineral (scenery) post.  Click on any photo to enlarge, click back button to return to post.

ice in lake fireweed scene  sunset
 cracker lake lunch spot  Glacial waterfall  drying lake early cracker

The plan was to hike a few days and take a rest day.  Our rest day became our longer journey back.   We took 2 days to blast to Glacier and 4 days to return at a more leisurely, explorative pace. This was our first road-trip in my “new” car (Camry Hybrid).  Bob is a good and steady driver – Yeah Bob!  Along the way there and back, we saw many wonderful sights as well as some fires.  Smoke in Montana, Oregon and California was uncomfortable (especially for my eyes).

Above are some Glacier scenes.  Below are Glacier (Bob and me), fires across the way from Crater Lake in Oregon, Glacier rock color, a cairn (if you’re a fan of this blog, you know how much I LOVE cairns).   Following those are a dam (or darn if you don’t like profanity) scene, a wonderful windmill garden in Electric City (enlarge this one for sure) and a description of Newberry Volcanic National Monument (if you’re interested – enlarge and read).  Last photo is Crater Lake panoramic.

bob on wah back cracker jayah fires from crater lake
rock color cairn

rocks in crack

Rocks in a crack

grand coulee windmill garden  Newberry Volcano sign
crater lake pano

On the way back from Montana, we went to the Grand Coulee Dam and the Chief Joseph Dam.  The tour at the Chief Joseph Dam was very interesting.  We went there because Bob read that it was a way better tour than the Grand Coulee.  We joined in with a group of 30 from a tribal youth camp.  One young camper –  in flip flop sway too big for his feet – lost a shoe in the one tiny place in the whole entire dam that could cause a major problem or shut down.  Disaster was narrowly averted and a dam executive finally retrieved the silly shoe.

A sponteneous stop – at Newberry Volcanic National Monument – We walked in a mile long, enormous cave (enlarge and read the sign).  We also walked along the shore of Crater Lake (above).

When building the Grand Coulee, it was political thinking at the time that this area of the country (the Northwest) would NEVER need that amount of power.  (Reminded me of the patent office commissioner in 1899 saying that everything that can be invented has been invented.)   Quite the enormous undertaking to tame the mighty Columbia –  the Grand Coulee now being one of 14 dams on that river.

Poor Salmon!  They’ve still not solved that issue.

Glacier National Park – 2 of 3

August 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Nature, Travel

Part 2 of 3 – Vegetable-ish (flowers, etc.)  It’s impossible (for me) to capture the abundance of hillsides full of color, but here are some close ups 🙂  Remember to click on any photo to enlarge and click the back button to return to the post.

penstemmon monkey in lava snowberries

Above are purple penstemon (the photo I worked hardest to take, laying on my tummy on the rocks), pink monkey flowers (in lava rock – technically not Glacier, but Newberry Volanic National Monument in Oregon) but we saw LOTS of monkey flowers at Glacier.  I really like how the pink contrasts against the black lava rock.  Last photo above of snow berries.  Below are are a rare white flower (our leader knew the name, but I forgot), fireweed, painbrush, columbine (my favorite flower photo), buckwheat and cascading corn flowers.

rare white flower fireweed paintbrush
columbine buckwheat cornflower

Here are some non-flowers, hence the term vegetable 🙂  lichen on cliff wall and 2 kinds of red berries.  If you’re going to enlarge just one or 2 photos, make sure you click on the lichen to see the colors of the rock and the detail.

lichen on argolyte red berries solomon berries

Thanks to my friend Alison for helping me select a new camera for this journey.  I think the close ups are reasonable and you’ll see in the animals post why I wanted the ZOOM.

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